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The 10 best champagne cocktail recipes
The 10 best champagne cocktail recipes
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The allure of cocktail champagne spans from the effervescent delight of a Bellini at brunch to the sophisticated sip...

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The world's oldest Champagne: secrets and mysteries revealed
The world's oldest Champagne: secrets and mysteries revealed
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In the world of prestige wines, the oldest Champagnes in the world represent a fascinating category, combining...

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Champagne cork speed: How fast does it jump?
Champagne cork speed: How fast does it jump?
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Opening a bottle of champagne is a symbol of celebration recognised the world over, but few people are aware of the...

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How to enjoy Champagne
How to enjoy Champagne
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Tasting Champagne is like tasting any other wine, except that effervescence has a sound component. Champagne awakens...

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Massal and clonal selections in Champagne
Massal and clonal selections in Champagne
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Thanks to massal selection, which consists of identifying the plants bearing the best fruit, and clonal selection,...

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Soil and subsoil of the Champenois vineyards

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The subsoil is mainly limestone, as are 75% of the outcropping sediments (chalk, marl and limestone). This type of subsoil favors soil drainage and lends a distinctive minerality to certain Champagne wines.

The Côte des Blancs, Côte de Sézanne and Vitry-le-François vineyards are located on outcropping chalk, while the Montagne de Reims is on buried chalk. The Vallée de la Marne (west of Châtillon-sur-Marne) and the small massifs around Reims (Saint-Thierry, Vallée de l'Ardre and Montagne Ouest) tend towards marl, clay or sand. The Côte des Bar (Bar-sur-Aube and Bar-sur-Seine) is mainly composed of marl.

Champagne chalk is composed of calcite granules derived from the skeletons of marine micro-organisms (coccolites) and is characterized by the presence of belemnite fossils (mollusks from the secondary era). Its high porosity makes it a veritable water reservoir (300 to 400 liters per m3), ensuring an adequate water supply for the plant, even in the driest summers.

Chalk retains water by capillary action, forcing the vine to absorb it. This results in moderate water stress during the growing season, favoring the balance between the fruit's various acids, sugar and aroma precursors that will be revealed in the wine to come.

Lithological formations inthe Champagne vineyards