Champagne Henri Giraud

In 1584, Pierre Gosset, alderman and winegrower of Aÿ, was selling still wines, usually red, from his own vineyards. At the time, two wines were competing for a place at the table of the King of France: the wines of Aÿ and the wines of Beaune a few hundred leagues to the south. Both were made from the same noble grape varieties: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. The reputation of the wines of Aÿ was such that François I set up a grape harvesting room there, which today belongs to the Gosset family. Then, in the 18th century, Aÿ and the wines of the region became sparkling. Even today, part of the ageing process continues in oak barrels for the vintages in old bottles, reproducing in full the bottles used by Champagne Gosset in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The Champagne Gosset house

The Gosset Tradition

For more than four centuries, everything has been done to continue the know-how of the family craft in the elaboration of our champagne.

In 1584, Pierre Gosset, alderman and winegrower of Aÿ, produced still wine, often red, with the harvest of his own vines.

At the time, two wines were competing for a place on the table of the King of France: the wines of Aÿ, and Beaune a few hundred leagues further south. Both were made from the same noble grape varieties: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

In the 18th century, Aÿ and the wines of the region became sparkling. Today, the vintages are still bottled in old bottles, an exact replica of the one used by Champagne GOSSET since the 18th century.

Malolactic fermentation is carefully avoided in order to preserve the malic acid
which restores the naturally fruity aroma of the Champagnes.

A unique 18th century bottle century as an emblem

Around 1760, Jean GOSSET used for the first time what would later become the logo of the Maison GOSSET logo: the antique bottle. This slender bottle, with its rounded sides and ultimate elegance, is an exclusive model in the family's old bottle collection. Its nickname is due to the "antique glass" color of the glass paste used in its composition.

The bottles used for the House's Cuvées Antiques are now faithful reproductions, with models featuring a distinctive champagne-colored collar for quick identification. Today, this vintage bottle is available in half-bottles, bottles, magnums and jeroboams.