The regions of the Champagne region

The wines of Champagne have a well known reputation throughout the world, but the land from which they come is little known . The vineyards of Champagne date back to the beginning of our era, and in 1927 an appellation d'origine contrôlée set the boundaries of the vineyards.

The Champagne region of France is located in the north, has difficult climatic conditions, is situated on hillsides and has a unique subsoil. These factors combine to create a unique terroir, which contributes to the unique character of Champagne wines.
Champagne is known for its four major terroir regions.

There are 4 main regions:

The Reims mountain is a mountain near the city of Reims, France

The Marne Valley is a wine-growing region that - beware of surprises - is located on the banks of the Marne! From Château-Thierry and Charly-sur-Marne to Epernay and Aÿ, pinot-meunier is on its land. So what special features does it offer? Very powerful wines, but they lack dynamism and lightness.

Because pinot meunier is not known to be a particularly fine and discreet grape variety. That's why it is often present in a blend of pinot noir and chardonnay, or used to give color to rosés. We can find some white wines.

The Champagne of the Marne Valley

The Marne Valley is a wine-growing region that - beware of surprises - is located on the banks of the Marne! From Château-Thierry and Charly-sur-Marne to Epernay and Aÿ, pinot-meunier is on its land. So what special features does it offer? Very powerful wines, but they lack dynamism and lightness.


Because pinot meunier is not known to be a particularly fine and discreet grape variety. That's why it is often present in a blend of pinot noir and chardonnay, or used to give color to rosés. We can find some white wines.

The Côte des Blancs and the Côte de Sézanne

The Côte des Blancs and the Côte de Sézanne are without doubt the most beautiful part of the Champagne vineyard. Indeed, this region produces the finest grape variety of Champagne, the least widespread too: the chardonnay. The only completely white grape variety in Champagne flourishes from the north ofAvize to Villenauxe-la-Grande, southwest of Sézanne. The only exception to this undivided domination of Chardonnay? The Vertus region, right in the middle, which produces the most sought-after Pinot Noirs in Champagne.

Even without having studied geology for a long time, one quickly realizes that the soil of the Côte des Blancs and the Côte de Sézanne is very rich in depth, and thus forces the roots of the vines to come and seek nutrients deep in the soil. This gives white grapes with a very strong potential, very complex and very fine.

Last step, the Côte des Bar

Last step of our long journey in the Champagne regions (well, without leaving our screen, of course, but long journey all the same), the Côte des Bar! With a plantation made mostly of pinot noir, the Côte des Bar is located between Bar sur Seine and Bar sur Aube. Yes, in the Champagne region, we are generally not very original when it comes to names.

The Champagne region of France is located on the northern latitude and has a dual climate, with both an oceanic and continental climate. This distinct terroir is what makes Champagne Champagne, and is what many other wines are often compared to.

Champagne has a dual climate, which helps the grapes grow well. The weather is mostly windy, but there are also long periods of sunshine and light rainfall.

The Champagne region has a limestone subsoil that provides the vines with constant natural irrigation. This is one of the characteristics of the terroir of the region.

The Champagne region of France has a unique combination of subsoil, terrain and climate for each vineyard plot. These variations create infinite combinations that make the region very diverse.